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Reading and Phonics

Phonics Statement

 

At Borden CEP School, we adopt a systematic approach to teaching phonics to support children’s development and success in learning to read and write. Discrete daily phonics lessons are introduced from Nursery and are progressively taught throughout reception, Y1 and Y2.

We predominantly follow the Letters and Sounds programme to ensure clear progression of skills throughout each phase of learning and across year groups.

A typical phonics lesson follows a four part teaching sequence and lessons are differentiated to meet the needs of all learners.

Revisit – previously learned graphemes, tricky words

Teach – new graphemes, tricky words

Practice – blending for reading and segmenting for spelling

Apply – Read or write a sentence containing the taught graphemes and tricky words

During phonics lessons children will sing songs, play games, practise speed sounds and learn how to use ‘sound buttons’ alongside learning to read and write.

Progression

Reception: Consolidate Phase 1 and Teach Phase 2, 3 and 4

Phase 1 involves learning about sounds and developing listening skills through a play-based approach. Children begin to explore the sounds they can hear in their environment; later learning to orally segment and blend sounds in words.  Children also learn about alliteration and rhyme through listening activities.

During phase 2 children are introduced to phoneme/grapheme correspondence through matching letters to sounds. Throughout phase 3 children learn the remainder of the alphabet letters and are then introduced to recognising digraphs and trigraphs (groups of letters that make only one sound such as ‘a’i and’ igh’). They also learn to automatically read and spell high frequency words (with a focus on tricky words - those that cannot be sounded out).

Children will practise their blending and segmenting skills to read and write words and by the end of the year children are expected to be able to apply their phonics knowledge to read and write sentences. During phase 4 children apply their phonics knowledge to read and spell more difficult words, including words with adjacent consonants (e.g. scrap) and polysyllabic words (e.g. play-ing, chick-en).

Year One: Consolidate Phase 4 and Teach Phase 5

Phase 5 introduces children to alternate ways to say and represent graphemes/phonemes, for example:

· The graphemes oa (as in goat) and ow (as in snow) make the same sound but are not spelt the same way.

· The grapheme ‘ow’ can represent two different phonemes (sounds), e.g. ow as in blow and ow as in crowds.

During phase 5 children consolidate their phonics knowledge by applying their skills in reading and writing and they learn to spell an increasing number of words correctly rather than relying solely on sounding out.

At the end of Y1 children sit a statutory Phonics Screen Test (please see below for further information)*.

Year Two: Consolidate Phase 5 and Teach Phase 6

During phase 6 children begin to develop their spelling, punctuation and grammar skills; learning rules for spelling and exploring word patterns (for example, adding prefixes and suffixes, learning to spell common exception words such as laugh and through).

*Children who did not pass the Phonics Screen Test in Y1 will re-sit it in Y2.

 

Phonics Assessment

Children’s progress is continually reviewed throughout the year to inform next steps in learning and plan for support to address children’s gaps in learning. Children who are identified as working below expectation will be selected for additional booster work and interventions to support their learning.

 

The Y1 Phonics Screen Check

In 2011 the government introduced a statutory phonics assessment for all Year 1 children. This test is administered in June of Year 1. It assesses children’s ability to apply the phonics skills they have been taught so that they are able to read 40 unseen words (20 of which are pseudo - made up - words).

The purpose of the screening check is to assess whether or not children have learned phonic decoding skills to an age related expectation. The children who do not meet the required standard for the check in Year 1 will receive additional support and then re-sit the test again in Year 2. As children enter KS2, provision is made for those children still requiring support in phonics.

At Borden CEP School, we adopt a systematic approach to teaching phonics to support children’s development and success in learning to read and write. Discrete daily phonics lessons are introduced from Nursery and are progressively taught throughout reception, Y1 and Y2.

We predominantly follow the Letters and Sounds programme to ensure clear progression of skills throughout each phase of learning and across year groups.

A typical phonics lesson follows a four part teaching sequence and lessons are differentiated to meet the needs of all learners.

Revisit – previously learned graphemes, tricky words

Teach – new graphemes, tricky words

Practice – blending for reading and segmenting for spelling

Apply – Read or write a sentence containing the taught graphemes and tricky words

During phonics lessons children will sing songs, play games, practise speed sounds and learn how to use ‘sound buttons’ alongside learning to read and write.

Progression

Reception: Consolidate Phase 1 and Teach Phase 2, 3 and 4

Phase 1 involves learning about sounds and developing listening skills through a play-based approach. Children begin to explore the sounds they can hear in their environment; later learning to orally segment and blend sounds in words.  Children also learn about alliteration and rhyme through listening activities.

During phase 2 children are introduced to phoneme/grapheme correspondence through matching letters to sounds. Throughout phase 3 children learn the remainder of the alphabet letters and are then introduced to recognising digraphs and trigraphs (groups of letters that make only one sound such as ‘a’i and’ igh’). They also learn to automatically read and spell high frequency words (with a focus on tricky words - those that cannot be sounded out).

Children will practise their blending and segmenting skills to read and write words and by the end of the year children are expected to be able to apply their phonics knowledge to read and write sentences. During phase 4 children apply their phonics knowledge to read and spell more difficult words, including words with adjacent consonants (e.g. scrap) and polysyllabic words (e.g. play-ing, chick-en).

Year One: Consolidate Phase 4 and Teach Phase 5

Phase 5 introduces children to alternate ways to say and represent graphemes/phonemes, for example:

· The graphemes oa (as in goat) and ow (as in snow) make the same sound but are not spelt the same way.

· The grapheme ‘ow’ can represent two different phonemes (sounds), e.g. ow as in blow and ow as in crowds.

During phase 5 children consolidate their phonics knowledge by applying their skills in reading and writing and they learn to spell an increasing number of words correctly rather than relying solely on sounding out.

At the end of Y1 children sit a statutory Phonics Screen Test (please see below for further information)*.

Year Two: Consolidate Phase 5 and Teach Phase 6

During phase 6 children begin to develop their spelling, punctuation and grammar skills; learning rules for spelling and exploring word patterns (for example, adding prefixes and suffixes, learning to spell common exception words such as laugh and through).

*Children who did not pass the Phonics Screen Test in Y1 will re-sit it in Y2.

 

Phonics Assessment

Children’s progress is continually reviewed throughout the year to inform next steps in learning and plan for support to address children’s gaps in learning. Children who are identified as working below expectation will be selected for additional booster work and interventions to support their learning.

 

The Y1 Phonics Screen Check

In 2011 the government introduced a statutory phonics assessment for all Year 1 children. This test is administered in June of Year 1. It assesses children’s ability to apply the phonics skills they have been taught so that they are able to read 40 unseen words (20 of which are pseudo - made up - words).

The purpose of the screening check is to assess whether or not children have learned phonic decoding skills to an age related expectation. The children who do not meet the required standard for the check in Year 1 will receive additional support and then re-sit the test again in Year 2. As children enter KS2, provision is made for those children still requiring support in phonics.

 

Spelling

 

Accurate spelling is embedded into our teaching and learning across the curriculum and not confined to discrete lessons. 

 

All our children are encouraged to ‘have a go’ at new words using the phonics skills they have acquired. Sometimes key words are given in the form of a word bank and high-frequency words can be seen on displays around the classrooms.  We do not correct every spelling error in their work as this would erode confidence and stifle experimentation with new vocabulary, but we do highlight an appropriate number of errors depending on the ability and age of the child concerned.

 

The children are often asked to complete homework tasks to support their progression in spelling. These tasks may be related to a particular topic, personal spellings based upon errors noted in the children’s work, looking at spelling patterns and rules or all three.  Spellings are tested often so that we can identify ‘next steps’ for the children to make improvements.

 

How you can help your child become an effective speller?

 

Your support is invaluable! Parents and carers are able to extend what happens in school and help children apply their learning to the world beyond the classroom. Here are some tips to help your child become an effective speller:

 

•        Make spelling fun, as children learn best through play – spelling activities are best seen as ‘playing with words’.

•        Not only listen and read to your child but read with them as good spellers are often good speakers and good readers.

•        Sort words into general groups; look at common patterns, as it is impossible to learn to spell every word separately.

•        Discuss and explain why a word is spelt in a particular way as that way your child will probably remember how to spell it.

•        Many children find computers highly motivating and there are some excellent resources available including the BBC website at http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/

 

Reading Books

Through our English and wider curriculum, we strive to develop a culture of reading through consistently using high quality texts, often linked to the Unit of Learning, that demonstrate aspirational language and grammatical structure; a variety of texts that inspire and enthuse children; texts with themes that help our children to develop and promote the school’s values as well as ensuring their personal, social, spiritual and emotion needs are met and where children are able to progress and reach their full potential.

Pupils in Early Years and Key Stage One are taught to read daily within phonics lessons and all our pupils are taught explicit reading strategies and skills through our whole class RIC (Retrieve, Interpret, Choice) sessions, allowing all our children to access more challenging texts and answer complex questions.

In each of our classroom environments, reading areas are created as a stimulating and exciting space to develop the delight of reading.

As part of every school day, adults read a class book aloud to the children to further promote a love for reading and exposure to high quality texts.

In addition, throughout the school year the importance of reading is enhanced through World Book Day, author visits, Book Fairs and sponsored reading events to further enrich our English curriculum.

To ensure we are reading high quality texts, we refer to a variety of recommended booklists, namely, CLPE Core Booklist, Pie Corbett Reading Spines and Book Award winners list (CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals; FCBG Children’s Book Award; Waterstone’s).

Pupils’ home-school books are closely matched to their phonic ability; pupils are able to enjoy books at both school and at home whilst applying their phonics to decode accurately.

 

 

 

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